Research Agenda

Research AgendaThe Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) is coordinating a unique, multi-funder initiative to identify, generate, synthesize and disseminate evidence essential to informing efforts to implement the recommendations outlined in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” and to contribute to Campaign for Action’s goal of advancing comprehensive change in health care for patients and the country.  The purpose of this activity is to increase and focus national attention on a common research agenda related to the IOM recommendations and to facilitate and coordinate funding activity across a range of funders of nursing research.   

*Please note: The application period for this round is now closed.

Research Questions

Education
  • How effective are various inter-professional education models?
  • What are the most effective policies to encourage supportive mentoring in nursing schools and in practice settings? 
  • What is the opportunity cost of adding new, different modules to the nursing curriculum?
  • What policy options can best address the goal of doubling the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020?
  • What is the range of costs of policy options to address the goal of doubling the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020?
  • What is the range of time frames for alternative policies to achieve the goal of doubling the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020?
  • Under various scenarios, what is the likely cost and time required to increase proportion of nurses with a bachelor of science in nursing degree to 80% by 2020 given current associate enrollments?
  • What is the actual cost to states/federal government for associate, bachelor and graduate nursing education?    
  • What impact would implementation of recommendation four (increasing the proportion of nurses with a bachelor of science in nursing degree to 80% by 2020) have on community colleges’ bottom lines?
  • How can nurses’ engagement in lifetime learning be ensured?
  • What competencies are most important to contemporary nursing care?
  • What are the core components of effective registered nurse (RN) or APRN residencies? Are these residencies cost-effective?
  • What are the pros/cons of alternative ways states measure, on an annual basis, the percentage of new nursing graduates prepared at the associate degree, diploma, baccalaureate or master’s level? How are those measures used in policy/practice?
  • What are the relationships between the percentage of newly licensed nurses prepared in baccalaureate or higher degree programs and the adequacy of the nursing workforce or extent of faculty shortages by state?
  • What strategies have states used to increase the presence of BSN and higher degree preparation in their nursing workforce. What strategies were most successful? Which strategies had little impact, or were not cost-effective?
Leadership
  • How can nurses best be prepared and enabled to lead change to advance health?
  • What are the optimal salary and benefit packages to recruit highly qualified faculty away from delivery organizations and into nursing schools?
  • Is there evidence that APRNs, given the opportunity to practice independently, will locate to rural or underserved regions?
  • What payment mechanisms would incentivize diffusion of care models in which nurses lead care programs or provide coordination and collaborative leadership?
  • What new technologies support nursing decision-making and care delivery?
  • Is there a value proposition for health plans’ using APRNs in panels? And if so, what value could be passed on to employers and consumers?
Interprofessional Collaboration
  • What are the effects of expanding scope-of-practice for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) on physician satisfaction, productivity and income in states? What scope-of-practice is optimal for patients in a fee-for-service world? In a world of bundled payments?
  • How do independently practicing APRNs collaborate with primary care or specialist physicians?
  • What models are ideal for determining adequate staffing in a range of care settings?
  • What policies and incentives foster teamwork and professional collaboration?
  • What models of care most effectively utilize the skills/expertise of RNs and/or APRNs in primary care?
Data
  • What percent of APRNs go into primary care?
  • Are there differences in documented care errors, never events or malpractice claims between states with independent APRN practice and those with barriers to independent practice?
  • Do states with broad nurse practice acts have better or poorer outcomes (e.g., health, health resource utilization) among patients with particular chronic illnesses like diabetes or asthma, or among underserved and Medicaid populations, than states with more restrictive practice acts?
  • What concepts of behavioral economics offer the most promise for provider/provider interactions and patient/provider interactions?
Information for Applicants
Permission to Post Proposal to the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community
By submitting a proposal, you: (1) grant the Foundation a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to post the proposal (including any content in the proposal that is covered by intellectual property rights), for review by prospective funders on the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community (or any successor site thereto), and (2) represent and warrant to the Foundation that (a) you own or otherwise have rights to submit the content in the proposal and (b) such submission and, if applicable, the posting of the submitted proposal to the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community does not and will not infringe the rights of any third party.
 
Limitation of Liability
Neither the Foundation nor any of the prospective funders on the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community shall have any liability to an applicant if: (1) the applicant’s proposal is not selected for posting on the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community, (2) the applicant’s proposal is posted on the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community but not selected for funding, (3) the applicant’s proposal is posted on the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community and is selected for funding but such funding is ultimately not provided (see “Being Selected for Funding Does Not Guarantee Funding”) or (4) the Foundation and/or any of the other prospective funders on the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community selects a proposal other than the applicant’s for funding (whether through the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community or otherwise), regardless of whether the proposal selected for funding is substantially similar to the proposal submitted by the applicant.
 
Proposals Selected for Posting will be Available to All Prospective Funders
The prospective funders participating in the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community may change from time to time.  The current list of participating funders may be accessed at www.thefutureofnursing.org/research.  By submitting a proposal, you acknowledge and agree that the proposal, if selected for posting to the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community, will be available for all prospective funders to review.  While you may elect to decline funding from a prospective funder that selects your proposal for funding, you may not select those prospective funders who will be able to review your proposal.  You may, however, elect at any time to have your proposal removed from the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community by sending written notice to Heather Kelley-Thompson at hkelley@nursing.upenn.edu.
 
Being Selected for Funding Does Not Guarantee Funding
If your proposal is posted to the Future of Nursing Funders’ Community and a prospective funder selects your proposal for funding, you will still be required to follow and satisfy the prospective funder’s normal application, due diligence, and approval processes, if any, before funding can be assured.